My Executive: Parker Gevirtzman
English
Close
You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search
Back to All Blog Posts

Foods to avoid and foods to consume for gut health

by Michael Cutler, M.D.

Your intestinal bacteria, yeast and viruses make up your gut microbiome, and directly impacts virtually all systems in your body. In this article, let’s look at the foods and artificial sweeteners that have been proven to adversely affect your delicate gut microbiome balance.

Gut health, so what?

I previously discussed that your gut health influences more than just digestion—it also affects your hormones (endocrine system), nerves (nervous system), and immune system.[1] Remember that there is a clear link between gut health and: intestinal inflammation·, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes[2], obesity and insulin resistance[3], heart disease[4] [5] [6] and bone health (via regulation of key brain hormones).[7]

Now you must be thinking about what you can do to influence your gut health, correct?

Let’s start with what foods you put into your mouth consistently.

Foods to avoid for gut health

Certain foods have been proven to adversely affect your delicate gut microbiome balance and diversity. 

A diet high in processed foods and refined sugars feed yeast and also pathogenic bacteria.  You may even discover that when you consume a large quantity of sugar foods, you’ll smell up the restroom differently that night or next day. This is a shift in the bacteria already. Just imagine what happens with consistent daily consumption of high sugars and processed foods.



Foods to consume for gut health

Fortunately, you can eat plenty of plant-based foods with fiber and lean protein and you will improve the gut acid-base balance (pH) and improve the health of your gut microbiome.

Add prebiotics (the food for healthy bacteria) to other nutrient-rich foods and you will be providing food for the health bacteria of a healthy gut microbiome. This short list of foods considered to be “prebiotic” foods gives you an idea of how important raw healthy foods are to a healthy intestinal tract and your health:

Chicory root, dandelion greens, jerusalem artichoke, garlic, onions, leeks, asparagus, flax seeds

Studies[8] suggest that even probiotic bacteria found in (plain) yogurt and other fermented milk products will improve your gut microbiome.

In my forthcoming blog, let's look at the best supplements proven to maintain a healthy gut microbiome.

To a healthy gut microbiota and long life,

Michael Cutler, M.D.

[1] Lange K, Buerger M, Stallmach A, Bruns T. Effects of Antibiotics on Gut Microbiota. Dig Dis. 2016;34(3):260-8. PubMed PMID: 27028893. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27028893

[2] Wen L, Duffy A. Factors Influencing the Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Type 2 Diabetes. J Nutr. 2017 Jul;147(7):1468S-1475S. Review. PubMed PMID: 28615382. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28615382

[3] Saad MJ, Santos A, Prada PO. Linking Gut Microbiota and Inflammation to Obesity and Insulin Resistance. Physiology (Bethesda). 2016 Jul;31(4):283-93. Review. PubMed PMID: 27252163. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27252163

[4] Miele L, Giorgio V, Alberelli MA, De Candia E, Gasbarrini A, Grieco A. Impact of Gut Microbiota on Obesity, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease Risk. Curr Cardiol Rep. 2015 Dec;17(12):120. Review. PubMed PMID: 26497040. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26497040

[5] Koeth RA, et al. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis. Nat Med. 2013 May;19(5):576-85. PubMed PMID: 23563705. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23563705

[6] Wang Z, Klipfell E, Bennett BJ, et al. Gut flora metabolism of phosphatidylcholine promotes cardiovascular disease. Nature. 2011 Apr 7;472(7341):57-63. PubMed PMID: 21475195.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=21475195

[7] Quach D, Britton RA. Gut Microbiota and Bone Health. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2017;1033:47-58. Review. PubMed PMID: 29101651. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29101651

[8] Wen L, Duffy A. Factors Influencing the Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Type 2 Diabetes. J Nutr. 2017 Jul;147(7):1468S-1475S. Review. PubMed PMID: 28615382. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28615382

 

Comments
Write a Comment Close Comment Form